Seventy-first World Health Assembly

21-26 May 2018

UN Palais, Geneva

Statements : 

Intervention on provisional agenda item 11.7 – Preparation for the third High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases, to be held in 2018

71th WORLD HEALTH ASSEMBLY

Speaker: Zuzana Kusynová from the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP)

Honourable chair, distinguished delegates,

Thank you for the opportunity to speak on behalf of the Alliance for Health Promotion, a global organization representing the views and expertise of civil society on health promotion.

Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs) cause premature deaths and people of all age groups, regions and countries are or could be affected. NCDs are long-term conditions that require a long-term approach in response.

The Alliance for Health Promotion strongly advocates for on-going health promotion activities to reduce common risk factors contributing to NCDs. Clearly, empowering individuals and communities with ownership of knowledge and means to be in better control of their health would contribute to an effective response to NCDs and underlying risk factors.

Awareness is key. We applaud UN and WHO on organising the third High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of NCDs. It will present the opportunity for countries to demonstrate their commitment to invest in NCDs programmes and planning. As well, it will strengthen the engagement of multiple stakeholders involved in NCDs-related health action, advocacy, literacy and health promotion. We would like to stress again that a health promotion approach can achieve a great impact in the fight against NCDs. 

Equally, we welcome the initiatives of WHO and other partners in promoting health and physical activity, such as the recent ‘Walk for Talk: The Health for All Challenge’ event. This event, together with the events organised through the Alliance contribute to the promotion of healthy behaviours, thus contributing to reducing the burden of NCDs.

Finally, we would like to reaffirm our commitment to contribute to WHO work.

Thank you for your attention.

Alliance for Health Promotion

Meeting: 

Seventy-first World Health Assembly (A71/1)

 

Agenda Item: 

11.1 Draft thirteenth general programme of work, 2019–2023

Statement: 

Honourable Chairperson, Distinguished Delegates,

Thank you for the opportunity to speak on behalf of the Alliance for Health Promotion, an alliance of international NGOs involved in health promotion with an aim to empower communities and individuals to gain ownership over their own well-being and enjoyment of a healthy life.
We support the Thirteenth General Program of Work as presented in draft document EB142/Rev3, underscoring Sustainable Development Goal 3, which calls for healthy lives and the promotion of well-being for all at all ages, and support the three strategic priorities as set out in the GPW13, namely: Universal health coverage; Address health emergencies and Promotion of healthier populations.
We, the Alliance and our member societies accept your invitation in paragraph14 to the global health community to work with the WHO in order to optimize the efforts to meet these priorities. The Mission Statement of the Alliance is to empower and involve communities to work on measures to improve health through health promotions.
As stated in items 34, 38, 41 and 42 of the GPW13, health care resources can be a barrier to achieving these goals and priorities. There is strong evidence that the involvement of nongovernmental organizations help to define cost-effective measures to promote healthy living and new care models. As such, we are keen to work with you and to share our expertise to further increase the impact of the implementation of GPW13.
We would like to highlight that financial efficiency and human resource education and support are both required for achievement of goals.
We support the need for healthy living starting before birth, supporting healthy pregnancies, nurturing early childhood development through to nurturing and supportive senior care through to dignity in death.

Copyright © 2018, non-State actors statements

Agenda Item: 

11.7 Preparation for the third High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of Non-communicable Diseases, to be held in 2018

Statement: 

Honourable chair, distinguished delegates,

Thank you for the opportunity to speak on behalf of the Alliance for Health Promotion, a global organization representing the views and expertise of civil society on health promotion.

Non-communicable Diseases (NCDs) cause premature deaths and people of all age groups, regions and countries are or could be affected. NCDs are long-term conditions that require a long-term approach in response.

The Alliance for Health Promotion strongly advocates for on-going health promotion activities to reduce common risk factors contributing to NCDs. Clearly, empowering individuals and communities with ownership of knowledge and means to be in better control of their health would contribute to an effective response to NCDs and underlying risk factors.

Awareness is key. We applaud UN and WHO on organising the third High-level Meeting of the General Assembly on the Prevention and Control of NCDs. It will present the opportunity for countries to demonstrate their commitment to invest in NCDs programmes and planning. As well, it will strengthen the engagement of multiple stakeholders involved in NCDs-related health action, advocacy, literacy and health promotion. We would like to stress again that a health promotion approach can achieve a great impact in the fight against NCDs.

Equally, we welcome the initiatives of WHO and other partners in promoting health and physical activity, such as the recent ‘Walk for Talk: The Health for All Challenge’ event. This event, together with the events organised through the Alliance contribute to the promotion of healthy behaviours, thus contributing to reducing the burden of NCDs.

Finally, we would like to reaffirm our commitment to contribute to WHO work.Thank you for your attention.

Copyright © 2018, non-State actors statements

Agenda Item: 

12.2 Physical activity for health

Statement: 

Physical inactivity leads to a major increase in health risks. Thus, the Alliance supports the need for exercise and healthy diet to reduce the morbidity and mortality from early childhood respiratory allergies​​ ​and ​ lifestyle conditions like​ ​hypertension, type​ ​2 diabetes, obesity, depression and protect them from other risk factors associated with non-communicable diseases.​

We endorse the need for interplay of policy makers, educationists and health professionals to create an environment that encourages men, women, children and communities to make life-changing decisions in lifestyles and physical activity.

Schools and colleges should introduce at least one hour of physical activity every day as part of their curricula and policies should make it mandatory to have sufficient physical and outdoor activity space for schools and educational institutions. Physical education and yoga among school children have been shown to have a positive impact on their performance academically too. We support the introduction of outdoor games for toddlers and children to avoid early habituation to the use of mobile gadgets and computers to play games and chat.

The rural-urban shift in many developing countries also leads to changes in diet and physical activity. Together with a sedentary lifestyle from desk jobs, these have caused a rapid escalation in NCDs.

In an increasingly stressful environment, physical activity has positive effects on physical and psycho-social well-being. Physical activity is an antidote to stress. And it reduces the socio-economic burden of catering for a population that is chronically unwell. Physical activity can aid the growing population of the elderly to be more healthy and functional thereby improving their quality of life.

The Alliance urges research leading to the development of physical activity and wellness indices of nations.

Copyright © 2018, non-State actors statements

Agenda Item: 

12.3 Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health (2016–2030): sexual and reproductive health, interpersonal violence, and early childhood development

 

Statement: 

We applaud and support the implementation of this roadmap. Given that approximately half of the world’s population is under 25 years, this strategy has come at a better time to achieve the SDGs.

The UHC drive must put women and their partners at the centre, reaching them from preconception until their children reach adolescence. It is crucial for governments to remove all economic, legal and discriminatory health system barriers, especially for adolescents, to access services that effectively respond to their needs. Psychosocial and mental wellbeing enables women and adolescents to acquire competencies to assert and protect their sexual and reproductive health rights (SRHR). Male engagement in SRHR helps reduce related violence against women and adolescents.

Eliminating major risk factors early from pre-conception and pregnancy to early childhood protects both mothers and children, particularly in low and middle income settings. Access to mental health services improves health outcomes for mothers, their children and adolescents. Nurturing, responsive care is especially crucial for HIV/ART exposed children’s cognitive and social development

We call on WHO and Member States to adopt a health promotion approach in implementing of this strategy and to seek governments’ financial investment and accountability; enact policies and allocate resources for integrating the nurturing care framework given its unquestionable social, health, economic and overall development benefits; strengthen inter-ministerial collaborations and partnerships with civil societies to implement UHC especially for women, children and adolescents; and invest in human capital (including adolescents as peer educators) for the services to reach all.

Copyright © 2018, non-State actors statements

Agenda Item: 

20.3.4.2 L. Strengthening integrated, people-centred health services (resolution WHA69.24 (2016))

Statement: 

To accelerate and sustain progress on developing integrated, people-centered health services, the Alliance for Health Promotion urges action towards a Framework Convention on Global Health, which would be based in human rights and aimed at health equity. We call upon the WHO, through the initiative of the Director-General or Member States, to establish a working group on the Framework Convention.
The Convention would serve as a vital instrument to ensure people-centered health services. It would include powerful norms and standards on inclusive participatory processes at all stages of policymaking, from local to global levels, serving Resolution 69.24’s strategy of empowering people and communities and creating accountable health systems. It could catalyze comprehensive, multi-sector action plans on health equity. And it could establish principles on right to health impact assessments and extraterritorial health rights responsibilities, better integrating health concerns across sectors.
Further, by putting people at the center of health, the Framework Convention could help ensure that health coverage is truly universal, and give life to the Sustainable Development Goal promise that “no one will be left behind.” The Convention could help guide and empower everyone from ministers of health to members of the most marginalized communities towards securing the people-centered health services that are central to the right to health.
Accordingly, we encourage the Director-General to use his authority to establishing a WHO working group on the Framework Convention on Global Health, or for member states to mandate the same. The working group should include state, civil society, and community participation, and could examine the possibilities of this Convention, including potential benefits, principles, parameters, and ways forward. Now, fourty years after Alma-Ata, this could at last secure health for all.

Copyright © 2018, non-State actors statements